México

10-04-2021
On September 30, 2021, the Executive Branch of the Mexican Federal Government submitted a bill to amend articles 25, 27 and 28 of the Political Constitution of the United Mexican States (the Reform Bill). If approved, this measure would, among others, repeal the constitutional reform of the electricity sector passed on December 20, 2013 (the 2013 Energy Reform), restore the state-dominant position in Mexico’s electricity industry through the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) and limit and control private participation in power generation, removing at a stroke the regulatory agencies that currently govern the national electricity system and the wholesale energy market.
08-25-2021
​​​​​​​The Garrigues office in México has, for the sixth consecutive year, received the Empresa Socialmente Responsable (ESR® 2021) award granted by the Mexican Center for Philanthropy (Centro Mexicano para la Filantropía or Cemefi) and the Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility (Alianza por la Responsabilidad Social Empresarial or AliaRSE) to enterprises that comply satisfactorily with the standards established in the areas of corporate social responsibility.
02-05-2021
After arduous legal battles in the Mexican courts with negative results for the Mexican Government in connection with a variety of regulatory and administrative provisions that de facto set back the 2013 Energy Reform, the President of Mexico submitted before the Mexican Congress a bill amending various provisions of the Electricity Industry Law (the Bill). The Bill was filed as a "preferred" bill, so it is subject to a fast-track procedure of discussion, voting and, if applicable, passing.
01-20-2021
The situation caused by the pandemic has brought an increase in breach of contract proceedings around the world, including in Latin America. It is therefore helpful to know how concepts such as fortuitous, force majeure, and hardship events are defined. We take a look at these in the legislation of Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.
11-03-2020
Pension fund regulations may be an incentive or deterrent when considering establishing operations in a country. This is why it is important to understand the new rules and situation of current legislation on the subject in various jurisdictions. Below we examine the current situation in Mexico, Uruguay, Peru, Colombia, Brazil and Chile.

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